By Patrick Kernan - [email protected]

‘Everybody’s Everything’ stands as a touching tribute to late Lil Peep

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‘Everybody’s Everything,’ a compilation record from the late Lil Peep, was released on Nov. 15.

There will always be a difficulty in releasing posthumous albums.

Unless the artist passes away in between the completion of the record and its release, there’s no way to know for sure if the album is what the artist would’ve wanted, or if it’s just a simple cash grab.

And while it’s still not easy to tell if “Everybody’s Everything” is exactly what Lil Peep would’ve wanted, but in a way, it feels closer than even the previous posthumous record, “Come Over When You’re Sober, Pt. 2.”

The record was released last week in conjunction with a documentary film of the same name produced by Terrence Malick of all people, focusing on the life and untimely death of Lil Peep, born Gustav Åhr, who passed away as a result of a drug overdose in late 2017 at the age of 21.

“Everybody’s Everything” is different from the previously released album as it’s a compilation record, cobbled together from odds and ends Peep had finished and either not previously released, or released only on mixtapes that are not available on major streaming networks.

The record ends up with a decided lack of polish due to this; but, in a punk rock sort of way, that’s always been a big part of the charm of Lil Peep’s music. It’s part of what attracted people to his music on early mixtapes “Hellboy” and “Crybaby,” something that was decidedly lost on his other major label releases.

“Everybody’s Everything” strips back that sheen, allowing the listener to revel in the raw emotion that Peep will be remembered for. The music on the record is at times dark and at others pop-twinged, showing Peep’s experimentations into the furthest extremes of his style.

Perhaps the best cuts on the record are those produced by Fish Narc, especially the three tracks previously released on Halloween in the EP “Goth Angel Sinner”: “Moving On,” “Belgium” and “When I Lie.” These tracks display the darkness that was prevalent in Peep’s unique blend of emo and hip-hop music, complete with beautiful, dusty lo-fi production.

But Peep also showed off his pop sensibilities, especially on later album cut “I’ve Been Waiting.” While we previously heard a very trendy, radio-friendly version of the song featuring iLoveMakonnen and Fall Out Boy, the version that we hear strips away Patrick Stump’s vocals and some of the more shimmery production.

Now, it feels more stripped down, displaying the heartbreaking simplicity of the song, and how great of a collaborative team Makonnen and Peep would have been had they been able to really bring their work to fruition.

Of course, there are weaknesses to the record, not the least of which being these songs obviously do not sound as though they were meant to be listened to as one album. But still, it’s a touching tribute to the late artist, showing the music that was left over at his passing and releasing it as close to how he wanted it as possible.

There will always be a deep sense of sadness listening to Lil Peep’s music, as it comes along with feelings of such a loss of potential. While we never got to hear Peep reach the full extent of what he could have been, at least we got what we did.

‘Everybody’s Everything,’ a compilation record from the late Lil Peep, was released on Nov. 15.
https://www.theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/web1_peep.jpg‘Everybody’s Everything,’ a compilation record from the late Lil Peep, was released on Nov. 15.

By Patrick Kernan

[email protected]

Album: ‘Everybody’s Everything’

Artist: Lil Peep

Label: Columbia

Length: 57:42

Best Tracks: ‘Belgium,’ ‘When I Lie’

Reach Patrick Kernan at 570-991-6386 or on Twitter @PatKernan

Reach Patrick Kernan at 570-991-6386 or on Twitter @PatKernan

Album: ‘Everybody’s Everything’

Artist: Lil Peep

Label: Columbia

Length: 57:42

Best Tracks: ‘Belgium,’ ‘When I Lie’