By Patrick Kernan - [email protected]

‘Herstory’ exhibit displays power of area women

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Autumn Granza’s “NEPA Herstory” exhibit features striking portraits of local women, telling their own stories.
Devoid of identifying details of the subjects — including their names and occupations — the series instead focuses on the subjects’ stories.

SCRANTON — With her recent gallery exhibition, one Throop woman isn’t look to tell history. Instead, it’s all about “herstory.”

Autumn Granza, 25, said she was inspired to use her photography skills to tell the story of local women who are doing great things in the area.

The project is called NEPA Herstory, and Granza, who also is a contributor to Weekender, said she got the inspiration after viewing many local women travel to Washington, D.C., for the 2017 Women’s March.

“I noticed how many local women went and were using their voices and having a really great time there, despite the circumstances surrounding it,” Granza said. “They’re slowly making change on their own.”

Granza said she’s been working on the project for about a year and a half at this point, and now she has something to show for it: 30 of her images are currently on display at AFA Gallery, located at 514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton.

The project features black and white portraits of local women, from the Scranton and Wilkes-Barre areas. For each portrait, Granza asked her subjects the same six questions, asking them to define what success means to them, what they’re proud of and what sort of advice they would offer their younger selves and women everywhere.

The stories the women tell Granza are paired with the portraits, and visitors to the gallery can read more about Granza’s subjects in a binder that accompanies the interactive exhibit.

But one major thing is purposely missing from the exhibit: any specific details about her subjects.

“I feel we’re more similar than we are different,” Granza said, explaining that many of her subjects had remarkably similar answers to Granza’s six questions.

As such, Granza’s portraits and accompanying stories are devoid of names, ages, occupation, town of origin or any other details. It’s all about their stories instead.

Granza’s project debuted at the gallery last Friday, at which the approximately 100 visitors contributed $200 to Granza’s fund for the Women’s Resource Center in honor of the project. She said it was the culmination of a ton of work, including rushing to meet interviewees while on her lunch break.

But that doesn’t mean the project is over yet.

“There are about 50 (women) in total right now, but there are more women who are interested in participating,” Granza said, adding that she has plans to continue to expand NEPA Herstory.

Granza said that, in 2018, it’s important that projects like hers exist.

“I believe everyone has a story and I think we’re at a point in time where it’s important for women, specifically, to share their story and let people hear their voice,” she said.

If you missed the opening of Granza’s exhibit on Friday, that’s O.K.; her work will be hanging until Oct. 26.

And if you’re interested in being featured in upcoming additions to NEPA Herstory, Granza encourages you to email her at [email protected]

Autumn Granza’s “NEPA Herstory” exhibit features striking portraits of local women, telling their own stories.
https://www.theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/web1_HERSTORY1.jpgAutumn Granza’s “NEPA Herstory” exhibit features striking portraits of local women, telling their own stories.

Devoid of identifying details of the subjects — including their names and occupations — the series instead focuses on the subjects’ stories.
https://www.theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/web1_HERSTORY2.jpgDevoid of identifying details of the subjects — including their names and occupations — the series instead focuses on the subjects’ stories.

https://www.theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/web1_HERSTORY3.jpg

By Patrick Kernan

[email protected]

Reach Patrick Kernan at 570-991-6386 or on Twitter @PatKernan

Reach Patrick Kernan at 570-991-6386 or on Twitter @PatKernan