By Justin Adam Brown - jbrown@timesleader.com

Penn State undergrads caught a ghost on camera — and the school funded their mission

Print This Page
Penn State Worthington students Kali Leggieri, Danielle Berghoff, Nick Montini, Michael Tatulli, Liz Durdan, Austin Spindler and Matthew Muracco make up the Paranormal Research Society.
Aimee Dilger | Weekender
The Worthington Scranton Paranormal Research Society, L-R Liz Durdan, Michael Tatulli, Nick Montini, Kali Leggieri, Danielle Berghoff, Matthew Muracco and Austin Spindler.
Aimee Dilger | Weekender
Michael Tatulli brings a photo up on his computer of “bleeding glass”.
Aimee Dilger | Weekender
Nick Montini powers up a reader that locates paranormal activity.
Aimee Dilger | Weekender

Recommended


    Michael Tatulli is a freshman at Penn State Worthington Scranton. Soon after his first semester classes began, the 22-year-old heard whispers of a paranormal research club that once had students investigating supernatural suspicions. Two months later, Tatulli found himself hearing whispers from a ghost he caught on camera. The footage was captured with the help of students from the new Worthington Scranton Paranormal Research Society, which he helped reinstate.

    “I resurrected the club from the dead,” he joked.

    Tatulli said his interest in the paranormal fueled following a chilling experience while serving in the military.

    “In the Army, they have a square drawn in the center of the barracks, and you have to stand with your toes on the line when they’re talking to you. They call it toe the line,” Tatulli explained. “I was asleep one night, and I wake up in the middle of the night, and I saw six or seven people standing ‘toe the line.’ I jumped up thinking I was in trouble. So I stood there, and the guy who was standing at the end, we called it fireguard, who stayed up and made sure nothing bad happened during the night, looked at me and said, ‘What are you doing?’”

    The fireguard saw no one else standing in the square, Tatulli said.

    The next day, his drill sergeant told him, “It’s an Army barracks” and “people have died” there, so “things happen.”

    Since then, Tatulli has been determined to unleash proof that ghosts exist.

    “That’s the whole purpose of this club,” Tatulli said. “For proof. There are a lot of theories that spirits give off electromagnetic field, which is measured by EMF detectors, that they can manipulate temperature, and that the more energy they get from electromagnetic field, they can move doors and objects and things like that.”

    The school funded $800 which allowed the rebooted club to invest in such tools, including an REM Pod (a device that beeps if a ghost touches its electromagnetic field), digital voice recorders, electromagnetic field detectors, and a spirit box, which rapidly scans the FM frequencies of the radio.

    Reviving the paranormal research club allowed him to unite other students interested in discovering the truth behind the existence of the supernatural.

    Danielle Berghoff, a sophomore, said she joined because she “wasn’t sure” if paranormal activity really occurred.

    “I just wanted to see what would happen,” Berghoff said. “Now I firmly believe, after what happened on our last investigation.”

    The last investigation was on Oct. 12, at The Colonnade in downtown Scranton. What was later discovered upon researching evidence had the group shocked.

    “There’s a hallway that had a window at the end of it,” Tatulli said. “We had a still camera set up down the hallway, and the REM Pod set up in the middle of the hallway, so that it would go off if something walked down the hallway.”

    The REM Pod went off. After watching the footage, Tatulli and his group witnessed a figure walking out, standing in front of the window, and whispering a message yet to be translated.

    As for skeptics, Tatulli said he’ll just refer them to the video, which can be seen on their Facebook page.

    Reach Justin Adam Brown at 570-991-6652 or on Twitter @TLArts. Follow him on Instagram and Snapchat @justinadambrown

    Some undergrads revive Penn State’s Worthington Scranton Paranormal Research Society to prove ghosts are a thing — and they claim to have video footage to back it up

    By Justin Adam Brown

    jbrown@timesleader.com

    Penn State Worthington students Kali Leggieri, Danielle Berghoff, Nick Montini, Michael Tatulli, Liz Durdan, Austin Spindler and Matthew Muracco make up the Paranormal Research Society.
    http://www.theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_wbw102815paranormal2.jpgPenn State Worthington students Kali Leggieri, Danielle Berghoff, Nick Montini, Michael Tatulli, Liz Durdan, Austin Spindler and Matthew Muracco make up the Paranormal Research Society. Aimee Dilger | Weekender

    The Worthington Scranton Paranormal Research Society, L-R Liz Durdan, Michael Tatulli, Nick Montini, Kali Leggieri, Danielle Berghoff, Matthew Muracco and Austin Spindler.
    http://www.theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_wbw102815paranormal1.jpgThe Worthington Scranton Paranormal Research Society, L-R Liz Durdan, Michael Tatulli, Nick Montini, Kali Leggieri, Danielle Berghoff, Matthew Muracco and Austin Spindler. Aimee Dilger | Weekender

    Michael Tatulli brings a photo up on his computer of “bleeding glass”.
    http://www.theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_wbw102815paranormal3.jpgMichael Tatulli brings a photo up on his computer of “bleeding glass”. Aimee Dilger | Weekender

    Nick Montini powers up a reader that locates paranormal activity.
    http://www.theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_wbw102815paranormal4.jpgNick Montini powers up a reader that locates paranormal activity. Aimee Dilger | Weekender

    Reach Justin Adam Brown at 570-991-6652 or on Twitter @TLArts. Follow him on Instagram and Snapchat @justinadambrown